August 20, 2012

Revisiting past posts for the newcomers.

AllAboutBlueberries

Soil sampling is important when planning to grow blueberries, or any other type of crop. In this webinar, Dr. Krisanna Machtmes from the LSU AgCenter gives a presentation on how to collect a soil sample and what to do after the sample has been collected.

Find out more by clicking here to go to The Importance of Soil Sampling.

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August 20, 2012

Revisiting past posts for the newcomers.

AllAboutBlueberries

EAST LANSING, Mich. – Surrounding agricultural crops with natural, biologically diverse areas helps provide habitat for important pollinators and promotes the stability and richness of crops worldwide, according to a new study by an international team of scientists recently published in the journal Ecology Letters — Volume 14, Issue 10, Pages 973-1073.

The article is a collaboration of researchers from 11 countries involved in 29 studies, including a study of Michigan blueberry fields by Michigan State University (MSU) entomologist Rufus Isaacs. Maintaining the delivery of ecosystem services, including those provided by pollinators such as honeybees and other species of bees, is an important topic confronting farmers and scientists.

Read more Pollination Study Shows Importance of Maintaining Natural Areas Around Crops.

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August 17, 2012

Revisiting past posts for the newcomers.

AllAboutBlueberries

Learn about connections between the foods we eat, our health, and the food system. This lesson introduces the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and the national nutrition education tool that implements these guidelines – the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Guide Pyramid. Other food guides have been developed for specific places, people and goals. For example, the Northeast Regional Food Guide (NERFG) is designed to promote healthful diets from foods grown and processed in the Northeast region of the United States.

Learn more about Food and You.

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August 17, 2012

Revisiting past posts for the newcomers.

AllAboutBlueberries

Read Blueberry Fun Facts to learn fun facts and get yummy blueberry recipes!

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August 17, 2012

Revisiting past posts for the newcomers.

AllAboutBlueberries

Creatures living in the soil are critical to soil quality. They affect soil structure and therefore soil erosion and water availability. They can protect crops from pests and diseases. They are central to decomposition and nutrient cycling and therefore affect plant growth and amounts of pollutants in the environment. Finally, the soil is home to a large proportion of the world’s genetic diversity.

The Soil Biology Primer from the USDA is an introduction to the living component of soil and how it contributes to agricultural productivity, and air and water quality. The Primer includes units describing the soil food web and its relationship to soil health, and units about bacteria, fungi, protozoa, nematodes, arthropods, and earthworms. It is suitable for a broad audience including farmers, ranchers, agricultural professionals, resource specialists, conservationists, soil scientists, students, and educators.

Read more about Soil Biology.

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Blueberry Planting Articles

August 15, 2012

Here are 11 articles and videos to help you make the right choices when planting blueberries:

http://www.extension.org/blueberry_planting/articles

 

New, Fresh-Market Blueberries Available for Southern Production

August 14, 2012

Released August 1, 2012

Growers and consumers alike stand to benefit from Gupton and Pearl, two new southern highbush blueberry cultivars developed by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) researchers in Poplarville, Miss.

In addition to high yields of plump, flavorful berries and vigorous growth, the new cultivars should give southern growers a jump on the lucrative, early-ripening fresh market, which starts in April and May.

According to Stephen Stringer, a geneticist with USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS), there’s been limited acreage of southern highbush blueberries because their lack of vigor has made them difficult to grow. Gupton and Pearl are different because they were derived from crosses made among southern highbush germplasm with improved adaptation to the southeastern United States, says Stringer. He’s with the Thad Cochran Southern Horticultural Research Laboratory, which is operated in Poplarville by ARS, the USDA’s chief intramural scientific research agency.

Stringer collaborated on the cultivars’ development, testing and release with ARS horticulturists Donna Marshall and James Spiers (retired) and ARS small-fruits breeder Arlen Draper (retired).

In Mississippi field trials, Gupton and Pearl flowered in mid to late April and were ready for harvest approximately 21 days before the earliest ripening rabbiteye cultivars, the predominant type grown in the South. The highbush cultivars produce firm, medium-to-large berries with light blue color and a high soluble-solids content, among other desirable traits. The cultivars themselves grow as cone-shaped, upright shrubs and have a chilling requirement (necessary for springtime blooms) of 400 to 500 hours at temperatures below 45 degrees Fahrenheit.

Gupton, released in 2006, and Pearl, released in 2010, are finding their way into crop fields and nurseries as more propagative material becomes available from tissue-culture operations and softwood cuttings. Several nurseries have requested Pearl, and some Mississippi growers already have planted Gutpon in small commercial plots, Stringer reports.

Michigan, Maine, New Jersey and other northern states lead U.S. production, but year-round demand for the antioxidant-rich berry has given southern growers a chance to get a bigger piece of the action—especially the early-ripening fresh market, for which southern highbush blueberries are ideally suited.

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USDA, http://www.ars.usda.gov/News/docs.htm?docid=1261

Browse related News by tag: blueberries

August 13, 2012

Revisiting past posts for the newcomers.

AllAboutBlueberries

Scouting for weevils is labor-intensive. Growers use beating sheets on blueberries or sweep nets among cranberries. Lures and traps would save precious time, and time is money. But until Rodriguez-Saona took to the field, no cranberry weevil pheromone had been identified, let alone tested to use in a lure.

Read more about Decoded Secret Betrays Berry Weevil.

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August 11, 2012

Revisiting past posts for the newcomers.

AllAboutBlueberries

Bob Danka for the USDA/ARS explains the importance of bees for blueberry pollination in this video.

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August 8, 2012

Revisiting past posts for the newcomers.

AllAboutBlueberries

Researchers at the Nova Scotia Agricultural College are looking for a few good beetles.

It turns out some of the bugs, one of the most common organisms on the planet, are great natural predators, a helpful trait that can be exploited by blueberry growers who want to naturally keep plant-munching bugs at bay.

Read more here.

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